Skincell Pro Reviews

Skincell Pro Mole and Skin Tag Corrector Serum is a liquid that promises the safe and quick removal of unwanted moles and skin tags right in the privacy of your own home.

It reportedly does this by triggering your body to send white blood cells to the unwanted blemish to remove and heal your skin.

They advertise that this action takes place in only eight hours. It is supposedly safe, painless, and all natural, with ingredients that are both ancient and modern.  It conveniently works on all skin types.

Product and Ingredients

Sanguinaria Canadensis (aka Bloodroot) - is a wildflower found in the eastern part of North America. It was reportedly used by Native Americans in traditional medicines.

It's called bloodroot because the roots will ooze a vibrant red latex when cut. It shows promise in dental care as a guard against plaque, and in swelling of the gums due to gingivitis.

There is not enough scientific data to support claims that Sanguinaria Canadensis improves or heals your skin.

Zincum Muriaticum - is a homeopathic ingredient. It is important to understand a little about homeopathy to explain how these ingredients work.

The principle of homeopathy basically states that a little of something bad, whether taken topically or internally, will cause your body to react and heal faster.  

This is where we get products like Syrup of Ipecac as a cure for poison. Syrup of Ipecac itself is a poison which will cause you to vomit, thus expelling whatever other poison you may have ingested.

Although there are ingredients in homeopathy that may be promising, such as the use of Arnica cream on sprains, it is a largely unverified science, though it has been around for hundreds of years.

Aloe vera - comes from the leaves of the aloe plant. Aloe vera is always surprising to people in that it has been used on burns for centuries, yet there is little scientific data to back up the claim that is helps ease the pain of burns or makes them heal faster.

There is not sufficient evidence to prove that aloe helps with eczema or dry skin. Aloe has shown some promise in helping reduce acne, but the studies were done along with the patients taking prescription acne medicine.

A cream made from aloe vera has shown some promise in treating itchy, scaly skin that is the result of psoriasis. It may also be effective in treating mild sunburns. That said, aloe also may also irritate skin, which makes it contraindicated in those with skin issues.

Acidophilus - While the benefits of acidophilus on the healthy bacteria in your intestines is widely known, there isn’t that much data on what acidophilus can do for your skin when used topically.

Studies have suggested that taking acidophilus pills orally may help reduce eczema in infants, but more data is needed to verify this claim.

Oat Bran - Oats are a cereal grain, recognizable as the oatmeal you eat for breakfast. Oats show promise in reducing swelling when applied to the skin, especially in the case of eczema and contact dermatitis, but more scientific research is needed to verify this.

Apple Pectin - Pectin is a fiber found in fruit that is often used as a thickener in cooking.

While people have reported pectin as a cure for conditions such as high cholesterol and heartburn, there isn’t a lot of data to back up these claims. There’s also little data regarding what benefits pectin may have on your skin.

Papaya Leaf Extract - There have been many claims about the benefits of all parts of the papaya tree, but these claims have not been backed by laboratory science. There’s also little data on the effects of using papaya leaf extract on your skin.

Prune Extract - While prunes and prune juice have a number of health benefits, prune extract, when applied topically, has not been proven to have any health benefits.

Black Walnut Hull - Black walnut has been reported to help a number of health issues, including healing wounds on the skin, but there is not enough data available to verify this claim.

Flaxseed - Although flaxseed and flaxseed oil are promising treatments for inflammation and some skin issues, more data is needed to prove these claims.

The majority of the data available is based on flaxseed and flaxseed oil taken internally, and there isn’t a lot of data on flaxseed and flaxseed oil used topically.

Potential Side Effects

Side effects of Sanguinaria Canadensis include skin irritation, white patches on skin, and a rash. Sanguinaria Canadensis can also burn and erode the skin, leaving you with uneven scarring.

Sanguinaria Canadensis can also be very irritating to the eyes, so be careful when applying to skin. Avoid Sanguinaria Canadensis if you have a latex allergy.

Aloe Vera - Do not apply aloe vera gel to deep cuts or serious burns. Do not use aloe vera on the skin if you have a latex allergy or are allergic to tulips, onions, or garlic.

Acidophilus used topically can cause a rash, itching, and swelling.

Papaya Leaf Extract - Do not use Papaya Leaf Extract on the skin if you are allergic to latex, as this can cause severe allergic reaction. If you are allergic to the fruit papaya, you should also avoid using papaya leaf extract on the skin.

How to Use

Skincell Pro is a topical serum. The recommended dose is a few drops onto each blemish.

Cost and Price Plans

The website does not give you pricing information until you enter your personal information, which is not a great sign. One bottle is $59.00. Two bottles cost $86.00. If you buy three bottles at $198, you get two free bottles.

Customer Service

You can contact customer service through a form on the website. There are no hours listed and no phone number provided.

Where to Buy?

You can buy the product on the company’s website. There are a number of other products available online with the exact same name, but under different company names.

Competitors and Alternatives

Haloderm Mole and Skin Tag Corrector is a similar product, but there is a warning on the website that lets you know it is unavailable for purchase in the United States.

Is Skincell Pro a Scam?

It should be simple to find ingredients, customer service, and pricing for a product. It was not. It was also nearly impossible to find a real review of this product.  

What you will find when researching this product are a number of reviews and news articles, which are actually just advertisements.  This leads us to question the authenticity of this product.

Also, if you need something burned off your face, go to a doctor. You should not be taking care of something like that by yourself, at home.

No product is going to replace medical care. If you were to have an issue after using a product like this, you’re still going to have to go to the doctor, and you still overpaid for this cream.

Further, if you have a latex allergy, this product should be avoided.

If you have any experience with Skincell Pro, please leave your reviews below.

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